Grow lashes!

If you are reluctant to try a prescription lash thickener, there is a lash grower for you from one of the most respected names in dermatology.

 
ElastiLash Eye Lash Solution by Obagi Medical is a non-prescription lash serum full of lash-coaxing peptides. Does it work? I noticed an improvement in my skimpy lashes in just the first week.
 
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The lowdown on Latisse

Dr. Deb Sherman and all about LatisseFew things make a women feel more beautiful than long, full, sexy lashes. Did you know that most off us bat them reflexively when we flirt? For years I have tried every trick in the book to enhance my own skimpy fringe. Then I found Latisse! Finally, the long, dark full lashes I had always longed for. It took about four weeks to work and then, voila – I had lashes to bat!

 
If, like me, you have been lash-challenged and have wondered about Latisse, Dr. Deb Sherman, an oculoplastic surgeon and board-certified ophthalmologist, will answer all your questions in our exclusive Q&A.
 
DD: How does Latisse work?
DS: We don’t know exactly how Latisse works, however, we believe it does so by increasing the growth cycle (anagen phase) of your eyelash hair cycle. Anagen is the growth phase of all hair. We believe that it increases the length of the anagen or growth phase and the number of hairs in this growth phase.
 
DD: Why do you need a prescription and where can I get one?
DS: Latisse is a prescription medication to grow eyelashes longer, fuller, and darker. Latisse needs to be prescribed by a doctor to assure the proper treatment and use. The active pharmaceutical ingredient in Latisse has been studied in clinical trials for its safety profile and effectiveness, and Latisse has been evaluated and approved by the FDA to grow lashes for those with inadequate or not enough lashes.
Any licensed doctor can prescribe Latisse. However, not all doctors may be familiar with it. To find one who is, use the “Find-A-Doctor” tool on Latisse.com.
 
DD: Is it very expensive?
DS: While the prices do vary slightly across the country, one Latisse kit costs on average about $120. It includes one bottle and 30 pairs of applicators.
 
Here are some cost saving pearls:
 
Visit Latisse.com to get updates on special discounts and promotions. Your readers should also note that Latisse has launched a philanthropic campaign visit — Latissewisheschallenge.com — which benefits the Make-A-Wish Foundation. With a minimum $20 donation, women can receive a free trial certificate for Latisse, which they can also take to their doctor to see if Latisse is right for them.  My patients feel good about giving to a great cause while getting a $120 lash growth product for a $20 donation. It’s a win-win! Also, ask your doctor whether he or she offers any additional discounts or knows of any local events that may offer discounts!
 
DD: How long does it take to work?
DS: Remember that your own hair and eyelashes grow at a relatively slow rate. I tell my patients that they need to be patient when using Latisse, as the growth is gradual over time. Patients may start to notice longer lashes after about a month, and experience full results in approximately four months. This is similar to the clinical trial results. But individual results may vary. But after four months of use, my patients really like the fact that their new longer, thicker, darker lashes are their own lashes. To maintain the longer, fuller and darker lashes, continued treatment with Latisse solution is required. Just like it takes some time to work, if use of Latisse is discontinued, the eyelashes will return to their previous appearance over the course of several weeks to months.
 
DD: Are there bad side effects from Latisse? If so, what are they?
DS: In my practice, most of my patients tolerate Latisse well. The adverse events I have seen in some of my patients, such as itchy eyes and eye redness, are consistent with those most commonly reported in the Latisse clinical trial. In fact, in the clinical trial, approximately four percent of patients experienced these common side effects.
Anyone considering using Latisse should also be aware that it may cause other, less-common side effects, which typically occur on the skin close to where Latisse is applied, or in the eyes. These include eye irritation, dryness of the eyes, redness of the eyelids, and skin darkening. Skin darkening (or hyperpigmentation) causes areas of skin to become darker than the surrounding skin color, but has been reported to be reversible after discontinuation of the product.
 
One of the most common questions I get asked about Latisse is whether or not it will turn eyes brown. Increased brown iris pigmentation, which is the medical term for darkening of the colored part of the eye, has occurred in patients when the same formulation of the active drug ingredient in Latisse, bimatoprost, was instilled directly into the eye as a treatment to lower elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Iris pigmentation was not seen in Latisse clinical studies, but Latisse patients should be advised about the potential for increased brown iris pigmentation, which is likely permanent.
 
When I reviewed the data where this risk came from, and understood that it occurred in the clinical trials when it was used as a glaucoma medication instilled directly inside the eyes, I felt comfortable recommending it to my patients to use it topically on their upper eyelids to grow their own lashes.
 
Full safety information is available at LATISSE.com and you should also talk with your doctor.
 
DD: Will Latisse grow hair on my face if it drips on my cheeks?
DS: It’s not likely to happen if you apply it properly, taking care to blot excess Latisse when it touches any area outside the upper eyelid treatment area. It’s important to apply the treatment as per the packaging instructions, taking care to blot excess Latisse when it touches any area outside the upper eyelid treatment area.
 
DD: Can I use Latisse to grow my brows?
DS: Latisse has not been studied or approved for use on the eyebrows. Latisse is only approved to grow lashes longer, fuller, and darker for those with inadequate or not enough lashes, also referred to as eyelash hypotrichosis.
 
Check important safety information and prescription information about Latisse at www.latisse.com and www.allergan.com.
 
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So long skimpy

If a prescription lash grower is not for you, but you long for long lush lashes, you may want to try L’Oreal Paris Concentrated Lash Boosting Serum. We have tried buckets of non-prescription lash-growing serums. Some have been divine, others have been duds, and they have all been pricy. This is just another reason we love L’Oreal Paris Concentrated Lash Boosting Serum. It gave us fabulous results at a nice price. A tube is about $15; shop around and you may get deal.

 
The effective formula contains a pro-keratine complex, pro-Vitamin B5 and pro-peptide. There is also canella asiatic which soothes. And it contains Arginine, a main component in keratine and essential for hair and lashes. Arginine is fast becoming an ingredient I look for, as it seems to be in all my favourite new beauty products. It is one of the main amino acids in keratin that can help nourish and repair the eye lash follicle. 
 
In clinical trials, after four weeks of using L’Oreal Paris Concentrated Lash Boosting Serum, lashes appeared fuller, stronger, and more abundant — and there is less lashes loss during make-up removal. I noticed a difference even sooner.
 
Apply it during the day under mascara to protect your lashes. At night, apply it to clean lashes and let the serum sink in.
 
If you are in hurry to flaunt your new luxe lashes, try L’Oreal Double Extend Lash boosting Mascara. It has a touch of serum in the basecoat and an ultra lengthening top coat. Your lashes will look instantly long, lush, and sexy as they grow strong and glossy.  www.lorealparis.ca    www.lorealparis.com
 
 
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